Warwick Castle – England’s finest medieval castle

Invaded, embattled, and besieged through centuries of warfare, Warwick Castle (pronounced “Worrick”) survived the ravages of history to become one of Britain’s major attractions and top 10 favorite castles.

Aethelfleda

It was King Alfred the Great’s daughter, Æthelflæd, who established the site of Warwick Castle in 914.

Built to defend the Kingdom of Mercia against invading Danes, the fortified settlement dominated the old Roman road called the Fosse Way, running southwest to northeast across the Midlands.

Following the Norman Conquest in 1066, King William I strengthened the fortification with a motte-and-bailey castle to maintain control of the Midlands while he marched northward.

Son of a powerful Norman family, Henry de Beaumont was appointed constable in 1088, to keep and maintain Warwick Castle for the king’s armaments.

Warwick Castle. Credit Baz Richardson
Warwick Castle. Credit Baz Richardson

Now part of Merlin Entertainments, the world’s second largest leisure group after Disney, Warwick Castle has received many accolades, including being recognized as Britain’s best castle by the Good Britain Guide 2003.

Join us as we enter Warwick Castle, the finest medieval castle in England.

Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds

The Barbican of Warwick Castle. Credit One lucky guy, flickr
The Barbican of Warwick Castle. Credit One lucky guy, flickr

Please tip the gatekeeper—wonderful fellow once you get to know him, but please try not to upset him.

Don't mess with this guy. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Don’t mess with this guy. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

Warwick Castle. Credit Steve Edwards, flickr
Warwick Castle. Credit Steve Edwards, flickr
Warwick Castle, Guy's Tower. Credit Elliott Brown
Warwick Castle, Guy’s Tower. Credit Elliott Brown
Guy's Tower. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Guy’s Tower. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

London2 126

Warwick Castle. Credit James Petts
Warwick Castle. Credit James Petts

Inside Warwick Castle

Who needs Netflix when you have live entertainment at home?

The Music Room. Credit Paul Renolds, flickr
The Music Room. Credit Paul Renolds, flickr

The Carnation Bedroom. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
The Carnation Bedroom. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

Lady Warwick (Daisy Greville) was a favourite of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales and entertained him and his entourage lavishly.

She and her husband were members of the Marlborough House Set, headed by the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VII).

When one was a favourite of the future king, their friends would “prove their worth” through favours.

Cecil Rhodes, a good friend of Lady Warwick, made sure that her investments in South Africa were successful.

Albert Edward, Prince of Wales visits Warwick Castle!
Albert Edward, Prince of Wales visits Warwick Castle!
Warwick Castle Parlor. Credit David Pettit, flickr
Warwick Castle Parlor. Credit David Pettit, flickr
Daisy's Bedroom. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Daisy’s Bedroom. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

You look beautiful ma’am, do excuse me while I change the baby for a cleaner one.

Warwick Castle bedroom. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle bedroom. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle Blue Boudoir. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle Blue Boudoir. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

Do excuse the maid—she's new.
Do excuse the maid—she’s new.

Third Class Accommodations

If you misbehaved at dinner, you may find yourself in third class accommodations deep in the bowels of Warwick Castle, i.e. the dungeons.

The Dungeons of Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
The Dungeons of Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

In the Middle Ages, a variety of devices were used on unwelcome guests to exploit their sensitivities to pain and glean confesssions and other useless bits of information.

Various implements of medieval torture. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Various implements of medieval torture. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

And if they were really lucky, they could spend the night in the gibbet.

Warwick Castle dungeons with gibbet. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle dungeons with gibbet. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

The Glorious Grounds

Warwick Castle grounds. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle grounds. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
The Mound, Warwick Castle. Dating from 1068, this is the oldest part of the castle, which is a Grade I listed building in England. Credit DeFacto
The Mound, Warwick Castle. Dating from 1068, this is the oldest part of the castle, which is a Grade I listed building in England. Credit DeFacto
Warwick Castle Gardens and Orangery. Credit Paul Reynold, flickr
Warwick Castle Gardens and Orangery. Credit Paul Reynold, flickr
A peacock strutting his stuff at Warwick Castle. Credit pjs2005, flickr
A peacock strutting his stuff at Warwick Castle. Credit pjs2005, flickr
Don’t mind us, we just live here
Peacocks at Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Peacocks at Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Eagle at Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Eagle at Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

Who said Chivalry was dead?

Jousting Knights at Warwick Castle. Credit Dark Dwarf, flickr
Jousting Knights at Warwick Castle. Credit Dark Dwarf, flickr
Jousting knights
Jousting knights

The collection of armoury on display at Warwick Castle is regarded as second only to that of the Tower of London.

Knight at Warwick Castle. Credit Jitka Erbenová
Knight at Warwick Castle. Credit Jitka Erbenová
Armor on display at Warwick Castle. Credit Peter K Burian
Armor on display at Warwick Castle. Credit Peter K Burian

Qu’est-ce que c’est, un trebuchet?

Warwick Castle is home to one of the world’s most powerful siege engine.

The Trebuchet at Warwick Castle. Credit Dave White, flickr
The Trebuchet at Warwick Castle. Credit Dave White, flickr

At 59 ft tall, the trebuchet is made from over 300 pieces of oak and weighs 24 tons.

Taking eight men half an hour to load and release, the trebuchet can hurl projectiles of up to 330 lb distances of almost 1000 ft and as high as 82 ft at a speed of over 120 mph.

Trebucket at Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds
Trebucket at Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds

Water Mill and Mill Garden

A water-powered mill in the castle grounds was probably built under Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick.

Warwick Castle water mill . Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle water mill . Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr

Adjacent to the mill is The Mill Garden which is privately owned but open to the public. Interesting views of the castle can be seen from this garden.

Warwick Castle from The Mill Garden. Credit Jessica Spengler
Warwick Castle from The Mill Garden. Credit Jessica Spengler

The Old Castle Bridge

Remains of the Old Castle Bridge, Warwick
Remains of the Old Castle Bridge, Warwick
Remains of the Old Castle Bridge, Warwick.. Credit DeFacto
Remains of the Old Castle Bridge, Warwick. Credit DeFacto

A day well spent!

As the light starts to dim over Warwick Castle, you will be reminded that time flies when you’re having fun.

A day to remember for a lifetime.

Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Warwick Castle. Credit Paul Reynolds, flickr
Read more:
Calke Abbey — An English Country House Frozen in Time

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The Beautiful Churches of Rural England

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